Dyslexia Box News

RSS

Coventry University Remote4All Project Collaboration 0

Back in October we announced our collaboration with the Centre for Healthcare Research at Coventry University on a research project looking at digital innovation and e-working for adults with disabilities and neurodiversities.

 

Coventry University has recently released further details about the nature of the project. You can find their press release below:


Coventry University academic launches Remote4All project to investigate the impact of remote e-working on people with neurodiversity and disabilities

 

A Coventry University academic has launched a project to investigate how the shift to working from home impacts people with disabilities and neurodiversity.

The COVID-19 pandemic forced millions of people across the UK to work from home and nine out of 10 disabled office workers surveyed by YouGov for the Trades Union Congress (TUC) want to continue working from home some of the time once the Covid crisis eases, with many fighting for the right before the pandemic began.

 

Now Dr Christine Grant, a researcher in the Centre for Healthcare Research at Coventry University, is working with the NHS in the South East of England, telecommunications company Vodafone, Coventry City Council, Leonard Cheshire, Dyslexia Box, SEND and other disability charities on the Remote4All project in a bid to fill a gap in understanding the impact of home working.

Dr Grant is leading on the Remote4All project and says the aim is to use the findings to help design policies and practices for inclusive work environments.

 

 

She said: “During the Covid-19 pandemic, homeworking increased rapidly, with 46% of working adults working from home by April 2020.[1]

“As we emerge from lockdown, many employers are looking to continue remote e-working, permanently or in combination with office-based arrangement.

“These new work arrangements might be ideal for some but not all, therefore, evaluation of remote working is essential to implement adjustments to accommodate all workers’ needs, while ensuring both productivity and wellbeing are maintained.

“There is a considerable lack of scientific knowledge about the advantages and disadvantages of remote e-working for individuals with disabilities. People with a disability and specific needs might be overlooked by employers, feel invisible and not valued as members of their work community.

“We believe information is needed, to give an in-depth understanding of the lived experience of people with disabilities or neurodiversity, and to gather insightful information for the design of policies and practices for inclusive work environments from employers and key stakeholders.”

 

 

The team will use information gathered from reviews of existing academic research and new in-depth online interviews with employers, employees and stakeholders to identify challenges and resources for the creation of inclusive work environments that will be used to advise on the main recommendations and guidelines for the future.

A toolkit will also be developed to support individuals, organisations and practitioners that can feed into guidance to influence wider societal and government policy.

 

 

Vodafone have shifted to a model allowing up to 60 per cent remote working and Carl Clarke, Vodafone Director Talent, Learning & Skills explained their involvement.

He said: “We are delighted to be working with Coventry University on the Remote4All project. As we embrace the transition to hybrid working, we want to ensure everyone has equal access to the benefits of remote working. This research will provide valuable insights into the remote working experience of people with a disability and those with specific needs, enabling us to better support all our employees and provide an inclusive remote working experience for all.”



For more information see: https://digit-research.org/research/innovation-fund/


[1] Figures from the Office of National Statistics. (2020). Coronavirus and homeworking in the UK: April 2020. https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/employmentandemployeetypes/bulletins/coronavirusandhomeworkingintheuk/april2020


Take a look at some of our related articles:


Neurodiversity in the Corporate World - Webinar Event Recap

On 23rd November 2021, we hosted the free live webinar event 'Neurodiversity in the Corporate World: Untapped Talent, Employee Retention and Success'. You can view the recordings of each of the sessions here.

Guest Blog by Danielle Kingdon

 

Danielle Kingdon is a Partner at Osborne Clark Law Firm, specialising in Employment Law. She has written a guest blog for us titled 'Embracing Differences - How to understand and support your neurodiverse employees'. She is also a speaker at our webinar event on Tuesday 23rd November.

Guy Brewer - YouTube Channel

 

Guy recently started his own YouTube channel to help spread awareness of neurodivergent conditions and assist people in overcoming their personal barriers. On his channel you'll find helpful tips, motivational stories and the key differences of each type of neurodiversity. 

 

 

Guy Brewer - YouTube Channel 0

Guy Brewer

- Dyslexia, ADHD and Dyspraxia Work Coach
- Associate coach for Dyslexia Box

 

Guy carries out strategy coaching to help people manage the impact of neurodiversity (specifically Dyslexia, Dyspraxia and ADHD) in the workplace. A few months ago, he started his own YouTube channel to help spread awareness of neurodivergent conditions and assist people in overcoming barriers. On his channel he provides helpful tips, discusses motivational stories and aims to increase understanding of those who are not aware of the differences of each type of neurodiversity.

 

Guy said:

 

"The purpose of my YouTube content is mainly to raise awareness about dyslexia and other associated neurodiverse conditions.

I do it on YouTube because so many of the people that I talk to say that YouTube is, or has been, their preferred learning medium.

It is mainly to help people think about what dyslexia is, the range of characteristics, the overlap with other conditions, and some ideas to manage some of the challenges.

Because some people are anxious about disclosing their dyslexia, I am hoping that more public awareness will ‘normalise’ it and make it more acceptable, and so put the focus on dealing with the challenges – not hiding them or ignoring them.

Being ‘positive about dyslexia’ is the rallying cry!"

 





See videos on topics such as these, plus many more...



Subscribe to Guy's YouTube channel:



Take a look at some of our related articles:


Mental Health Support in the Workplace

Considering the strain of the pandemic on our mental health, Dyslexia Box want to highlight the Access to Work Mental Health Support Service - which offers free mental health support to help people start or stay in work.

 

 

Video Resources For Dyslexia Awareness Week 2021

Take a look at some videos from our YouTube channel which are great resources for learning more about supporting dyslexia in the workplace. Do your part for Dyslexia Awareness Week!

Dr. Deborah Leveroy - Supporting Dyslexia in the Workplace

Dyslexia Box's very own Deborah Leveroy led a webinar at the Diverse Live: Neurodiversity Digital Focus Day, discussing 'Supporting Dyslexia in the Workplace'. Watch here entire webinar here!

 

My Autism Assessment Journey 0


Guest Blog


 

The following guest blog was written by Jan Hanson, ADSHE Quality Assured SpLD Study Skills Tutor, Associate Tutor for Diversity and ABility and Associate Trainer and Coach for Dyslexia Box.

Jan carries out workplace coaching and assistive technology training to help individuals with neurodiversities in the education sector and the workplace.



'My Autism Assessment Journey'

- By Jan Hanson


Hello, my name is Jan Hanson and I’m Autistic, heck that’s actually the first time I’ve written it.

Yes, I’ve written I have ASC/ASD but those are just letters. To actually write out ‘Autistic’, now that’s different. I suppose it’s me finally acknowledging who I am and being comfortable with that.



Finding out and receiving my diagnosis last November at the age of 56 means much of this is still new to me and I’m still learning a lot along the way.

By this I mean I have had habits pointed out to me that I thought everyone did - for example, talking to themselves, twiddling rings, or hair. However, this is all part of my Autism! My hyperfocus (or obsession, as my family would call it) to prove people wrong and achieve academically has seen me study continually for the last thirty years! To me, that’s completely normal.

 

Now, all this has a name.

I was lucky that within my studies I had to complete a general screening so already had a diagnosis of Dyslexia and Dyspraxia, so I expected my profile to be spikey regarding my working memory and processing of information. However, when I read the answers and recommendations it said “Autism Spectrum Disorder significant difficulties” whereas Dyslexia and Dyspraxia were both coming out as having moderate difficulties.

It did take me by surprise, so I decided to take control and see if the screener was correct.

Even by paying privately and contacting the National Autistic Society, any assessment centre in or around London had a 5-to-12-month waitlist to be seen. If I had waited to be referred by my GP, I would have had to wait two years (no matter which part of the country I lived in). However, I contacted an Autism Psychology Practice in Middlesbrough and started the assessment five days after I had completed the screener.

 

I found some of the rigorous tests frustrating and extremely tiring, which really surprised me, I suppose it shouldn’t have because I was having to concentrate so much. There were questionnaires to complete, with questions and interviews for both my mum and husband.

Questions like: What was I like as a child? Did I have friends? Things I had never thought about.

I think the most difficult test was my Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS-2), where I had to travel to Middlesbrough. Seeing as I work completely from home, going somewhere this far is quite a challenge.

 

The journey 

 

Getting there

Is a satnav, right?

Do I have enough fuel?

Do I have enough time?

When do I need to leave home?

Which way should I go the way I am familiar with or follow Google?

Can I park?

What if I get stuck?

Who do I call if I’m going to be late or have got stuck?

 

This all usually happens before I even leave the house - often the night before, and then I don’t sleep just in case my alarm doesn’t go off in the morning. This means I am already stressed when I arrive at my destination.

In this instance, when I arrived and entered the room, I kicked the table and knocked my coffee everywhere!

 


As you can see, this is a regular thing that I do for every situation but now I know that it’s a part of who I am. It has answered a lot of questions from when I was younger about what I did and why.

The most important thing for me is that from writing that I’m Autistic at the beginning of this blog, to writing it now, there have been several weeks - but it has allowed me to accept myself for who I am, and I like who I am. I am also happy to say to people that I’m Autistic. Some people’s reactions have been enlightening, but that’s their issue and not mine.

 

Since my diagnosis (horrible word, I’m not sick), I’ve begun to notice that I’m masking much less than I was before.

Things are now black or white rather than grey - but then I wonder if they ever were grey, and my desire to fit in meant I never really admitted it.

Not anymore.

People must like me for who I am, not who I was trying to be.

 

 

"In three years, I’ll know that it’s the real me who will don the doctoral gown and be proudly walking into York Minster with her autism assistance dog - not just an impostor looking like me."

 


Blog written by Jan Hanson, ADSHE Quality Assured SpLD Study Skills Tutor, Associate Tutor for Diversity and ABility and Associate Trainer and Coach for Dyslexia Box.


If you would like to find out more about our Coaching and Training services then contact our team today.



Take a look at some of our related articles:


Guest Blog by Guy Brewer

Guy Brewer is an Independent Dyslexia, ADHD and Dyspraxia Work Coach and associate coach for Dyslexia Box. His guest blog is all about Workplace Strategy Coaching, titled 'Workplace Coaching: A Dyslexia Coach's Perspective'. Find out more about Guy and read his blog here.

Guest Webinar by Ellie Middleton

Ellie Middleton is Head of Community at Neuropool, Personal Brand Manager at Great Influence, prominent Neurodiversity advocate and a LinkedIn sensation. Her guest webinar is titled 'Things it's ok to ask for when you have ADHD'. Find out more about Ellie and watch her webinar here.

Guest Blog by Michelle Brown (Learning Labs)

Michelle Brown is the Strategic Relationship Manager at Learning Labs. Her guest blog titled 'How aware are students of the Access to Work programme?' discusses findings from a report with APPGAT into the extent of student's knowledge of Access to Work and also looks into hopes for the future.

Workplace Coaching: A Dyslexia Coach’s Perspective 0


Guest Blog


 

The following guest blog was written by Guy Brewer, Independent Dyslexia, ADHD and Dyspraxia Work Coach and associate coach for Dyslexia Box.

Guy carries out strategy coaching to manage the impact of neurodiversity (specifically Dyslexia, Dyspraxia and ADHD) in the workplace. He also has his own YouTube channel to help spread awareness of neurodivergent conditions and assist people in overcoming barriers.



'Workplace Coaching: A Dyslexia Coach's Perspective'

- By Guy Brewer


One of the hardest questions that I deal with from my clients, is usually the first one.

They say, “So, what is this workplace coaching thing?”

And it is not the easiest question because coaching is different for everyone. It depends upon that individual. I use a person-centred approach. I don’t have a programme that I dish out to everyone in the same way each time. Everyone I meet is different. Everyone has a different ‘blend’ of neurodiverse traits. No two people are the same. That is the joy, and the challenge.  

Quite a lot of my clients have been having a tough time in work. For one reason or another, their dyslexic and/or other neurodiverse traits, have led to challenges in the workplace. That can lead to frustration and overwhelm, anxiety and stress, and is not great for productivity – which frustrates them and their managers!

 


So, what IS workplace coaching for dyslexia?

 

The short answer, is that it is a process that rebuilds self-confidence and self-esteem, rekindles the passion for your job and makes your life better.

 

But that is a bit simplistic and vague. And for people who are maybe having a hard time it doesn’t have enough substance to be convincing. They want to know what is going to actually happen in a session. Is it worth the time?

Dyslexia is a thief of time for many people – reading can take longer, checking spellings and punctuation after struggling with composition is time-consuming. There is no time to waste. Coaching has to be good and be productive.

So, what I tend to say, is what my past clients have told me. They say that it is wonderful to have the time to think about how you do what you do in work, and to have the opportunity to think about how to do things differently, to get the results that you want.

Often, people with dyslexia are so busy trying to keep up with the constant workload, that they don’t have the time to stop and think about how they could be doing things differently. Or, for some, their confidence has been badly dented and they are reluctant to propose changes, especially if that is to their managers or colleagues who may not seem to be very understanding of dyslexia.

 

"Workplace coaching provides dedicated time to think, in a safe and non-judgmental environment."

 

It is time to consider what works well for you, what could be better, and how to do things differently and more effectively at work. I can offer ideas and strategies that I know have worked well for other people.

My clients tell me that they like this time to think and to hear about other people’s experiences. It is a chance to bring clarity to what may previously have been a situation fraught with frustration and overwhelm.

As I am the person ‘delivering’ the coaching it might sound as though I do something special to rebuild confidence and self-esteem. But actually, that’s not the reality.

I don’t know these people, or their jobs, or anything much about their situations. So, I can’t tell people what to do! People with dyslexia are in practically every occupation. I am not training anyone to do anything.

And there is no tuition – I don’t teach people anything. They have all learned to read and write. It may not be their most comfortable medium for communication, but they can do it.  

 

But here’s the thing… the people that I coach, who come from all walks of life, are creative and imaginative, great problem-solvers, incredibly resilient and hard-working, and have great integrity. This makes life fascinating because I know that the answers to the challenges probably already exist in their minds, and are simply waiting to be revealed.

So, what I do, is ask questions. That is how, between us, we find out what their strengths are, what their values are - the things that matter most to them, and what they need to do a great job.

 

 

Before I was a coach I worked in education as a peripatetic teacher for pupils with additional needs. I worked with the pupil, their teachers, the headteacher and deputies, the parents of the pupil, and any other professionals involved. I learned how to listen.

In my last few years in that role, I managed a team, so I understand the pressures from both sides of the management divide. Listening helped then too!

I learned that asking questions was often more helpful than imposing ‘solutions’ on people. It is far more empowering for a person to come up with the solutions themselves, with a bit of help from others, than to be always given those ‘solutions’.

 

However, for me, it is always a temptation to tell someone to try something out.

I warn new clients of this weakness of mine, as the same thing happens every single time!

I’m listening away and a ‘brilliant’ idea pops into my head.

When there is a pause, I say, “I have just had a brilliant idea!”

“What is it?” they say, fired up by my enthusiasm.

“Have you thought of trying…ABC?” I say, bubbling with excitement.

Their face falls. “Oh yeah,” they say, “I did try that. It was rubbish. It didn’t work for me.. But now that you mention it, what did work was XYZ!”

And suddenly, they are inspired, because they have just thought of a great idea to manage their existing problem. And then they thank me – as if I had done something! Which I hadn’t – it was all their work. I was just the catalyst.

Then they say, slightly puzzled, “Why didn’t I think of that before?”

And the reason why they didn’t was because they work so hard, racing to keep up, that they don’t have the TIME to think. Coaching allows that time.

 

 

"For me, it is a great privilege to be a workplace coach."

 

People trust me with their vulnerabilities and sessions can be emotional. For some people this is the first time that they have spoken openly to someone else about their struggles – and the first time that they have spoken to someone who understands what they are talking about.

I have been coaching for 6 years now and have spoken to a lot of people with dyslexia, dyspraxia, ADHD, dyscalculia and autistic traits. So, I can tell the people that I meet for coaching, while respecting client confidentiality, that they are not alone in their challenging experiences, and that there are many others who are going through the same struggles and frustrations. They are NOT being stupid, lazy or crazy!

Of course, there are other factors in the workplace that need to be taken into account. People need the right environment to work in, the right technology and the training that supports that, and they need colleagues and managers to be understanding and aware of the challenges that the neurodiverse brain can present. These topics feature a lot in our sessions too.

 

"Workplace coaching supports personal development and it supports productivity. And that’s a win-win situation."


Subscribe to Guy's YouTube Channel


Blog written by Guy Brewer, Independent Dyslexia, ADHD and Dyspraxia Work Coach and associate coach for Dyslexia Box.


If you would like to find out more about our Workplace Strategy Coaching services then contact our team today.



Take a look at some of our related articles:


Guest Webinar by Ellie Middleton

Ellie Middleton is Head of Community at Neuropool, Personal Brand Manager at Great Influence, prominent Neurodiversity advocate and a LinkedIn sensation. Her guest webinar is titled 'Things it's ok to ask for when you have ADHD'. Find out more about Ellie and watch her webinar here.

Guest Blog by Michelle Brown (Learning Labs)

Michelle Brown is the Strategic Relationship Manager at Learning Labs. Her guest blog titled 'How aware are students of the Access to Work programme?' discusses findings from a report with APPGAT into the extent of student's knowledge of Access to Work and also looks into hopes for the future.

Update on Coventry University Remote4All Project Collaboration

Coventry University has released further details about their research project looking at digital innovation and e-working for adults with disabilities and neurodiversities. Dyslexia Box are proud to collaborating on this project. Find out more here.

'Things it's ok to ask for when you have ADHD' 0


Guest Webinar


 

The following guest webinar was created and presented by Ellie Middleton, Head of Community at Neuropool, Personal Brand Manager at Great Influence, prominent Neurodiversity advocate and a LinkedIn sensation.

Last year, Ellie was assessed with ADHD and has since discovered that she also has Autism. After going viral on LinkedIn and being a strong advocate for neurodiversity, she has now built an incredible community of over 20,000 like-minded people.



'Things it's ok to ask for when you have ADHD'


In this webinar, Ellie discusses some common barriers that people with ADHD can face in day-to-day life - such as auditory processing, written language, memory, organisation and concentration - and provides helpful solutions to tackle each of these barriers. She then discusses what Access to Work (AtW) is and walks through the AtW process step-by-step.

 


"It's not dramatic to say that it's [the ADHD assessment] honestly changed my life"

 

We are extremely excited to have teamed up with Ellie Middleton to bring you this brand new webinar.

In October 2021, Ellie was assessed with ADHD and she is also currently waiting on an Autism assessment. After going viral on LinkedIn and learning of her neurodivergent brain, she has been an amazingly vocal neurodiversity advocate and has built a strong community of over 20,000 people with her ADHD hacks, inspirational stories and general vunerablity that she shares with her audience.

 

Below, you can find the timing breakdown of the topics that Ellie discusses in her webinar:

00:00 - Welcome
00:39 - Introducing: Ellie & Her ADHD Brain
04:08 - So... give me some tips!
06:42 - The Barrier: Auditory Processing
07:50 - The Solutions?
08:58 - The Barrier: Written Language
09:35 - The Solutions?
10:23 - The Barrier: Memory & Organisation
10:50 - The Solutions?
15:07 - The Barrier: Concentration
16:18 - The Solutions?
21:08 - What is Access to Work?
21:42 - The Process
23:51 - Thank you!

 

Watch Ellie's full webinar on YouTube


Presented by Ellie Middleton, Head of Community at Neuropool and Personal Brand Manager at Great Influence.


If you would like to find out more about Access to Work and Dyslexia Box's services then contact our team.



Take a look at some of our related articles:


Guest Blog by Michelle Brown (Learning Labs)

Michelle Brown is the Strategic Relationship Manager at Learning Labs. Her guest blog titled 'How aware are students of the Access to Work programme?' discusses findings from a report with APPGAT into the extent of student's knowledge of Access to Work and also looks into hopes for the future.

Update on Coventry University Remote4All Project Collaboration

Coventry University has released further details about their research project looking at digital innovation and e-working for adults with disabilities and neurodiversities. Dyslexia Box are proud to collaborating on this project. Find out more here.

Neurodiversity in the Corporate World - Webinar Event Recap

On 23rd November 2021, we hosted the free live webinar event 'Neurodiversity in the Corporate World: Untapped Talent, Employee Retention and Success'. You can view the recordings of each of the sessions here.

How aware are students of the Access to Work programme? 0


Guest Blog


 

The following guest blog has been written by Michelle Brown, Strategic Relationship Manager at Learning Labs (part of eQuality Solutions).

Learning Labs provide e-Learning for education and the workplace covering mental wellbeing, assistive technology, accessibility, study skills, career skills and more.



How aware are students of the Access to Work programme?



Back in 1994 the Access to Work programme was set up with the aim of helping individuals with a physical or mental health condition or disability get or stay in work. During the 2020 to 2021 financial year 37,170 people were in receipt of Access to Work payments. However, of those 37,170 only 10% were aged 25-29 and just under 10% were aged 18-24, the age groups that are most likely to be transitioning from education to work. Could the numbers within these age groups have the potential to be higher? Are there people entitled to Access to Work who are missing out and therefore encountering unnecessary barriers within the world of work? That is what e-learning portal Learning Labs and the All-Parliamentary Party Group for Assistive Technology (APPGAT) recently set out to answer.

 


Who are Learning Labs?

 

Learning Labs is part of eQuality Solutions (eQS), a group of companies that aims to unlock true potential and improve outcomes for both individuals and organisations by removing barriers to learning in education, employment, and life.

Learning Labs is an online e-learning portal which gives users access to 4,122 tutorials, or Labs, on an array of topics such as assistive technology, careers and study skills and accessibility tools. By having access to these Labs wherever and whenever they like, users are empowered to overcome any barriers independently.  

Earlier this year Learning Labs also launched a brand-new mental wellness portal based on their unique concept – the Six Domains of Mental WellnessTM. Within the mental wellness portal users can learn about mental wellness, then assess and develop their own mental wellness as often as they like via the unique assessment tool and a series of Action Labs.



Who are the All-Parliamentary Party Group for Assistive Technology?

 

The All-Parliamentary Party Group for Assistive Technology (APPGAT) consists of 14 MPs from all major parties and representatives from 32 supporting organisations from across the UK. Their aim is to disseminate knowledge, generate debate and facilitate engagement on assistive technology amongst Members of both Houses of Parliament. They achieve this by holding events in Parliament, bringing experts together for roundtable discussions and briefings, contributing to government consultations, and promoting the group and its activities amongst parliamentarians.



What is student’s understanding of Access to Work?

 

Earlier this year Learning Labs and APPGAT teamed up to learn what student’s understanding and experience of Access to Work was. Learning Labs sent a 25-question survey to its students that had claimed Disability Student’s Allowance during their time at university and were now in their final year of study and therefore likely to be applying for Access to Work in the near future. The survey was completed by 371 students. The most notable finding from the survey was that 80% of students had never heard of Access to Work. As a reminder, these are students that are in their final year of studies and will therefore be entering the world of work very soon.

 

 

When asked if their university provided them with any information about disability support in the workplace (for your post-graduation career) 66% of respondents said no. This explains why, out of the 19% of students who had heard of Access to Work, 33% of them had discovered it by conducting their own research.

 

 

It is therefore important that conversations about Access to Work take place before, during and after a job search to ensure as many individuals as possible benefit from the programme. To enable this joined up process to take place everyone from university Careers Advisors to DSA Needs Assessors to employers need to be aware of, and championing Access to Work.

40% of survey respondents said they would consider turning down a job offer/leaving a job if they did not receive the appropriate support for their needs. It’s therefore important that any support continues throughout their career.

With a Learning Labs account employees receive access to over 4,000 Labs. Each Lab guides them through how to use a particular Assistive Technology software from SuperNova Magnifier and Screen Reader to Spellex Write-Assist. With remote working increasing in popularity there are also Labs on useful software such as Microsoft Teams and Zoom. As everyone has a different learning style all Labs are available as a Do, Watch or Read Lab with Quiz Labs providing a fun way to challenge yourself once you’ve completed all the Labs for that particular software.

 


Where do we go from here?

 

The good news is initiatives have already been announced to try and bridge the gap between education and the workplace for people with a disability. At the beginning of December, as part of their National Disability Strategy, the government announced a new pilot ‘passport’ scheme to complement the existing Access to Work grant scheme.

The passport will contain all the necessary medical information, adjustments and benefits a graduate already receives. This will prevent them from having to undergo repeated health assessments and repetitive disclosures that are part of the job and grant application process. The passport also aims to empower the graduates and grow their confidence around having the conversations about their disabilities with potential employers.

With any effective conversation though it should not be one-sided. It’s important that everyone the student encounters along their journey to employment, from DSA Needs Assessors to Career Advisors and even employers are aware of and having open discussions about Access to Work.

Hopefully with these conversations taking place, and these new initiatives from the government, when Learning Labs and APPGAT repeat the survey over the coming years we will see the statistics flip and 80%, if not 100%, of students will HAVE heard of Access to Work.


If you would like to receive the report of the full findings of the Learning Labs and APPGAT survey, or if you are interested in a free Learning Labs demo then please email Michelle Brown, Strategic Relationship Manager at Learning Labs.

michellebrown@e-qualitylearning.com


Blog written by Michelle Brown, Strategic Relationship Manager at Learning Labs


If you would like to find out more about Dyslexia Box's services then contact our team.



Take a look at some of our related articles:


Update on Coventry University Remote4All Project Collaboration

Coventry University has released further details about their research project looking at digital innovation and e-working for adults with disabilities and neurodiversities. Dyslexia Box are proud to collaborating on this project. Find out more here.

Neurodiversity in the Corporate World - Webinar Event Recap

On 23rd November 2021, we hosted the free live webinar event 'Neurodiversity in the Corporate World: Untapped Talent, Employee Retention and Success'. You can view the recordings of each of the sessions here.

Guest Blog by Danielle Kingdon

Danielle Kingdon is a Partner at Osborne Clark Law Firm, specialising in Employment Law. She has written a guest blog for us titled 'Embracing Differences - How to understand and support your neurodiverse employees'. She is also a speaker at our webinar event on Tuesday 23rd November.